Stuco hosts dodgeball tournament

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Two of the dodgeball teams playing in the tournament on Oct 21.

Ashton Hoffman, Staff reporter

De Soto’s yearly dodgeball tournament took place this past Wednesday, Oct. 21. With Covid-19 restrictions and no spectators, things were certainly different from last year.

Even with the Covid-19 pandemic, Student Council still found a way to continue the yearly dodgeball tournament. Even though it was out of the ordinary, the participants still had fun.

“I think everybody had a fun time overall, and I think it was a good thing that Stuco still somehow found a way to do it, even with the position we’re in now with the pandemic,” said junior Pep Club executive Zander Barkemeyer. 

The dodgeball tournament was altered in several different ways, including the participants playing on the football field, as well as wearing masks while they were playing. Even with the many changes, there were many students who formed teams and played it out.

“Even though playing on the football field was definitely different, it didn’t really affect the playing of the game, but the masks did in a way,” Barkemeyer said.“You couldn’t really breathe in it and sometimes it would get in the way, which could cost you.”

 Eight teams participated in the tournament, and while fans would be in attendance under normal circumstances, that was not possible this year due to the restrictions. Although there were no spectators there to make noise and cheer the students on, there was still lots of noise to be heard from the players. 

“We played on the football [field, but] there were still no spectators. They [certainly] could’ve helped with making the game louder,” Barkemeyer said. “But in the end, I don’t think it mattered too much because everybody was yelling and screaming and having fun so it was never quiet, which I think was good.”

Even with all of the changes made to the tournament this year, students still made the most of it and didn’t let that affect them. 

“In the end, it seemed like everybody was having a good time and enjoying themselves as well as just playing the game, as long as they had fun then that’s what matters and that is what we aimed for in the end,” Barkemeyer said