Wildcat of the Week: Lucas Beggs

Senior gets involved with local police departments

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Wildcat of the Week: Lucas Beggs

Senior Lucas Beggs poses next to a police patrol vehicle in Kansas City, Kansas.

Senior Lucas Beggs poses next to a police patrol vehicle in Kansas City, Kansas.

Wildcat Photo

Senior Lucas Beggs poses next to a police patrol vehicle in Kansas City, Kansas.

Wildcat Photo

Wildcat Photo

Senior Lucas Beggs poses next to a police patrol vehicle in Kansas City, Kansas.

Erin Pickert, Feature Editor

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While seniors at De Soto High School are busy finishing their high school careers, many are preparing for future careers behind the scenes. Senior Lucas Beggs has been busy with law enforcement departments around the area. 

Lucas expressed an interest in law enforcement my first year as an SRO [Student Resource Officer] at De Soto High School. We just had several conversations about it, and I recommended he attend the Youth Citizen’s Academy at the sheriff’s office,” former DHS SRO Jonathan Keys said. 

Beggs has been involved at the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office, Shawnee Police Department and the Kansas City, Kansas, Police Department.

“At the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office, I did their youth academy for two summers. At the Shawnee Mission Police Department, I did their Explorers Program. At the KCK Department, I will be starting an internship there on Oct. 10,” Beggs explained.

After all the experience he has gained with the police departments, Beggs plans to continue the work after graduation from DHS.

“Right after I graduate, I’ll be going to Johnson County Sheriff’s Office, and I’ll probably be a CS (Civilian Specialist),” Beggs said. “I would be working in the jail, in the booking lounge and getting people booked into jail and such.”

According to Beggs, if he is still involved in the program once he is 21, he will be deputized and able to go on patrol.

A career in law enforcement requires a high level of integrity and someone that makes sound decisions in life,” Keys said. 

Beggs feels up to the challenge and is ready to pursue this life-long passion.

This has been a long-time goal for Beggs ever since he was young. 

“It has always interested me since I was a little kid. Not just because of flashing lights and loud sirens, but there’s something about being able to help somebody on their worst day and that is just an honor to be able to do,” Beggs said. 

There are many reasons that Beggs is passionate about the work he’s doing, but his favorite part is “being a person everyone goes to when everything is going wrong.”

The job, however, also comes along with hardships.

“I’d say the hardest part of being involved would probably be the mental aspect of it. You’re dealing with people’s worst days everyday for 12 hours a day,” Beggs said. 

Yet after the long hours of work and dedication, Beggs is looking forward to more of this demanding work in his near future. 

Keys is additionally excited about having more young people such as Beggs involved in the police force.

“Having young people interested in law enforcement is good for a variety of reasons. It helps reduce the negative perceptions people have toward law enforcement as a result of the media,” Keys explained. “It also serves to establish an open dialogue between the law enforcement community and the people they serve.”

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